Episode 34 Dhara Thompson
Sail Boat Project

This week we’re learning about how to move food around planet earth via just the power of the wind.  Awesome produce, better for the environment, direct from the producer to the consumer, delivered by the wind.  I’m going to take you back in time, when beautiful tall ships criss-crossed the sea to deliver foods we couldn’t grow ourselves. 

You might think I’m describing the 18th or 19th century. Actually, I’m only turning the clock back by a few months, when a former herring logger called The Gallant sailed serenely into Newhaven, with a cargo of olive oil, almonds and sea salt.

This programme is about the amazing groups that have an impressive vision:  to transport food and drink across oceans(and to our plates) in a way that is not only kinder to the planet, but – in the case of Sail Cargo South East  – also supports community groups who benefit from being out on the sea…. Plus they give hospitality businesses like The Herb Kitchen brilliant stories to share about their wind-powered ingredients.  

You’ll hear from Dan Cuss, co-founder of The Herb Kitchen later in the programme.  But first we meet Dhara Thompson, co-founder of Sail Cargo Southeast and the Sail Boat Project based in Sussex

Episode 30 Hugo Hardman and
Arthur Voelcker – Chalkstream

In this episode we’re going to learn about farmed fish. When Hugo Hardman and Arthur Voelcker launched ChalkStream® in 2015, people tended to dismiss farmed trout as small, bony and muddy; salmon’s much poorer cousin.   

That’s why, in the early days, they had to get right in front of chefs, and show them what farmed trout could really become – if it was grown in fast-flowing clear waters that mimic the conditions of the fish’s natural habitat: the Test and Itchen chalk stream rivers in Hampshire.   

As you’ll hear, their so-called ‘power point presentation’ of a framed photograph and a large glistening trout on ice, worked wonders.  Now ChalkStream clients include big names such as P&O Ferries, British Airways and Wimbledon, as well as top restaurants all over the UK… and the trout farmers Hugo and Arthur work with face a much more secure future. 

Discover how, in the space of a few years, this partnership has managed to shake up trout farming in an impressively sustainable way.   

https://www.chalkstreamfoods.co.uk

Episode 26 Pete Joy
Bakehouse 24

For someone who had no business plan, but thought he’d be alright because there was a Waitrose round the corner, Pete Joy, at Bakehouse 24 is doing pretty well.

Pete’s love of mixing and kneading emerged out of the blue, one night, when his housemates were at band practice. Having the place to himself, he decided not to do a normal thing like ordering Chinese, but to make a cake instead. This wasn’t a one-off: Pete soon developed a serious baking habit, which led to a 3am-to-midday job at a pioneering sourdough bakery under a Hackney railway arch.

In this episode you’ll hear how the man with no plan is successfully building a team of sourdough bakers (one of whom is also a potter) across two sites in Dorset…and why he gets a bit ranty on the topics of gluten intolerance and interpretations of the word ‘sourdough’…. You’ll probably sympathise by the end of the conversation. Enjoy.

Episode 23 Emily Davis
Blue Vinny Cheese

‘Unique’ is often misused as a word, but this week you’ll hear about a delicious food product that really is one of a kind.  In the early 1980s, dairy farmer Michael Davies resurrected a 300 year-old recipe for Dorset Blue Vinny – a subtly veined cheese which is much more delicate than Stilton, its nearest relative.   

Nowadays, Michael’s daughter Emily is in charge of production – overseeing the only farm in the world that has the legal right to produce this type of blue cheese. 

Today you’ll hear how the patient Davies family had to put up with blue mould on their cornflakes, in the early days of Michael’s cheese experiments…and why Emily describes beta versions as ‘nuclear’! 

You’ll also discover how a disappointing trip to a farmers’ market led to a whole new branch of the Blue Vinny business…and why wonky cucumbers and misshapen cheese off-cuts have a special place in Emily’s heart… 

Enjoy the conversation… 

Episode 16 Karen Richards
Capreolus Charcuterie

When David Richards was made redundant from his sales director role, finding a new one at 50 was very hard. Luckily, he had always loved cooking and smoking cuts of meat in the garden, so when his wife Karen suggested that there might be a business in curing, they gave it a shot.

10 years later their company, Capreolus, has won countless awards for its ever-increasing range of mouth-watering charcuterie and smoked foods, from pancetta and air-dried pork loin to the magnificently named Rampisham Tingler Salami.

In this edition you’ll discover why it’s so important to get the right sort of business funding – if you can; why the fat of rare breed animals is the star of good charcuterie… and what it’s like dealing with restaurant food crazes, where smoked venison might suddenly replace air-dried beef, and you realise, with a sinking heart, that you have no venison on the premises and a six month lead time…